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20130416
20130416
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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
environment that will make people want to work here. >> reporter: despite the competition, many of the visitors from japan became interested in coming to brazil. >> translator: the more i learn, the harder it seems to do business here. but i think brazil has huge potential as a market. >> reporter: the competition for labor is starting to spread into more and more rural areas in brazil. but that's unlikely to discourage japanese companies from investing in this rapidly expanding economy. nhk world. >>> let's now get another check of the market figures. >>> crews at the damaged fukushima daiichi nuclear plant in japan have started work on a project to stop highly contaminated water from escaping into the environment. tokyo electric power company workers discovered three of seven underground storage pools are leaking. tepco officials believe pools one and two may be leaking the most. so they're placing priority on draining them. on tuesday, workers started transferring about 20 tons of water per hour from pool two to an above ground tank more than 400 meters away. officials say th
is at work. everybody is on this. in that kind of an environment with a large city like this, large police department, obviously the first responders on the scene are race volunteers, runners themselves, passersby. and emts. how does it work practically to have the foeb in charge? the n fbi is coordinating it. what does that mean when they're dealing with a large sort of resources. >> first of all, new in being a real attack is not new to the city of boston, the state of massachusetts and the federal authorities up there. back in 2011, just over two years ago, and previously before that the federal government in conjunction with boston did exercises exactly to prepare for situations like this. so what you have is the immediate response is always going to be governed by the boston police department and fire department. and then over team there will be a transition to the fbi. but most importantly, this has to be done hand in hand. the state, local and federal cooperation, this isn't honestly like the movies, where the fbi shows up and says we're in charge now. the relationship between the f
of the environment. >> trauma surgeon explaining that there have been doctors in surgery since early this morning. he's been in surgery since 8:00 this morning. he's performed several surgeries on the injured victims of today's bombings. the bombings took place at approximately 2:50 p.m. local time. the trauma surgeon reporting one of his medical partners here at massachusetts general has military experience and has served in both iraq and afghanistan. the doctor describing that experience, that wartime experience as being apparently very useful today. as doctors treated some of the more than 130 people who were injured. there are many, many unanswered questions tonight. including unconfirmed reports about other potentially explosive devices. found on or near the scene of the bombings today. law enforcement officials have not confirmed that there were other unexploded bombs for lack of a less specific but more politic term. as of tonight the official confirmation is that there were two devices. only two. those were the two that caused the massive explosions. to the extent that there were other device
to provide a very secure environment. you literally can't do it. if your standard is nobody can be at risk at a large public event, we're never going to have another u 2 concert. there are basic procedures for events like this. they're well established. we've learned from everything from the '96 olympic bombings to what you should do. are this they going to do a review? did we do the due diligence? they'll have to. it will be pretty clear whether that was done or not. and then we'll move on from there and we may learn some things to improve. we've got a pittsburgh marathon coming up, other things. you can't stop these public events. you can't make them perfectly secure, but you can do due diligence. the key point is the best way to stop these attacks is good intelligence, good police enforcement that goes out and finds the perpetrators before they do something. >> you can't protect every inch of a 26.2 mile race of course, that's for sure. james carafano, security expert in washington. thank you so much for being with us. really appreciate it. >> thanks for having me. >> reporter: thanks s
they are able to say if they were small bits of metal place there had intentionally or part of the environment. >> forensic pathologist fox news contributor dr. michael baden live this morning. what do you think? >> i think a lot of information being retrieved not only from the streets, but also from the bodies, the surgeons working on people are removing shrapnel, some of which comes from the bomb. the medical examiner's office this morning will do the autopsies on the three people that died. the first thing they will do identify the bodies but take x-rays of the bodies so they can remove any shrapnel that can be part of the bomb. but they also have two in tact bombs. >> we think. we don't really know that. >> allegedly. if indeed they do -- >> if the early reports are true. >> -- and any bomb that didn't explode there's a probe of information they can check back who made the wires. >> who bought the bags. >> what about in terms of shrapnel for lack of a better word in bodies how can that lead to anything? >> that is part of the bomb. it can telling y you where this of object was purchased, w
on in the macro environment environment. i like the you have to pick your spots and be very aware what is going on around you. melissa: panel, thanks for your insight. we really appreciate it. >> thank you. melissa: coming up on "money" with have exclusive interview with the co-owner of the boston celtics what he is doing to make fans are safe at the game. this will change his way of doing business. oil falls to the lowest level in a month. we'll tell you why. plus what effect will the boston bombing have on the price of crude. stay right here. a lot more "money" straight ahead. we went out and asked people a simple question: how old ithe oldest person you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn changed: the official retirement age. ♪ the question is how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years. ♪ at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like
something. about being aware of your environment. if it looks unusual. tell something abit. a -- about it. >> best advice. don't let them affect your life. go back and live your life. >> live your life. when you compromise how you live that gives them a victory. as painful as it is to day. you can't let them succeed by us changing the norm and how we live. can't let them win. no victories. >> i think the last point is so important. you can't let them win. can't say i will not go to the ball game because of what if? that's what they want. >> that's what they want. they want you to stay home and watch this coverage and be too scared to do anything. you have to go out and live your life. important clues, for as chaotic as that look. there are important clues of behind the -- >> the injured. if anybody has hand injuries. some one could be using bomb make mag terl and residue on their hants. >> this shrapnel and things that could have come from the device itself. >> that's right. and pierre thomas is reporting what they want to see is how was it detonated, remotely detona detonated, with a cel
the environment of the blast, these are things that were packed into the bomb. >> i think we are still getting details of all the events that happened, and obviously it's very difficult to conclude, based on initial impressions. i won't exclude completely the possibility that some of the fragments are environmental, but my opinion is that most of them were in the bombs. >> reporter: most of the injuries were to the lower portions of the body. a possible indication of a more sophisticated, directed blast. now of the 31 people who were brought here 12 still remain. six to eight are under anesthesia at this moment. there were four amputations performed here and the doctors say for the most part these were automatic amputations, that the limbs had endured so much trauma the way one doctor described it, they just finished what the bomb had done, jon. jon: so for those who are still hospitalized how is it looking? >> reporter: the doctors won't make any promises, but they said it's looking pretty good. there are some limbs that are still at risk of amputation. also you had patients out here with a l
no, but the good thing is that we're actually in an urban environment and there's a lot of buildings around and other materials that will stop some of this evidence as it crawls across the pavement and it will be found. the agents will go in and start conducting a crime scene investigation to find even the most minute pieces of evidence and what we call bag and tag and send to the laboratory. in the laboratory, the forensic scientists, examiners, will look at these pieces of debris and then start making conclusions as to what the device consisted of. >> how do you-- i understand how you could piece together what was the bomb made of. how did it work, how was it detonated and so on. but how-- we're told in the pan am 103 bombing which you helped investigate, that it was a thumbnail sized piece of evidence that led to the identity of the bomber. i mean, how can that be? how can you get to the identity from the remnants of the bomber? >> well, sometimes in pan am 103, the fragment of the circuit board that was the timer that detonated the device, is so generically-- well, not genericall
anything else becoming empowered to look into your environment and what we're seeing from boston, heroes is comi
whether these were small bits of metal placed there intentionally or part of the environment. >> reporter: shrapnel is just one of the clues investigators will be looking at. >> there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments everywhere, there are fragments within the victims. fragments in the sidewalk. what they're going to be able to do is probably reconstruct the timer device, what was used, they're going to look at the components of the bomb, able to tell them is this just somebody that put this together over the internet or is this a bomb maker? >> reporter: hundreds of state and federal investigators have descended on boston to try to find out who could have built the bombs and set them off. >> there are federal, state and local law enforcement all on scene and coordinating very close ly. the fbi has taken charge of the investigation. >> reporter: this type of attack has long been law enforcement's worst fear, a soft target where suspects can easily blend in and inflict mass casualties. the boston marathon is a heavily policed event. more than 500 national guard troops were on s
. how do you see the regulatory environment playing out? and how are you going to improve margins in this scenario? >> actually, my margins improved by 140 basis points over the quarter. so we had a record margin for the first quarter. so over a 40% margin. i was asked specifically, can our margins even improve more, and i said, well, we have a lot of pressures on regulatory issues. we're reinvesting in our company by hiring more people. so i was just being cautionary. but to answer your question, our margins have had improved year after year. they're going to improve from 2012 into 2013. i believe our business model will allow margins to improve, despite, despite, we're spending at more money on lawyers, spending a lot more time working with our regulators. and i think this is just the cost of doing business moving forward. >> we'll leave it there. larry, always wonderful to have you on the program. thanks so much for your time. >> thanks, maria. >> larry fink, black rock. we have a market up 112 points. we are still waiting on answers coming out of boston in terms of suspects. w
a weaker or softish commodity environment will drive that even further and higher. >> when i see you, the one commodity which is oil, give me your take here and correct me if i'm wrong, but you've always been a big bull. >> yeah. reality is oil. we just don't have a lot of new sources for it and you really have to take the world and slam it to almost zero growth before that would really undermine the supply/demand picture for oil. oil production grows about a million, a million and a half barrels a year and demand grows about that amount and the cost structure to bring that on is now $80 to $90 a barrel and i can't say this doomsday scenario that people say the oil markets will be prone to, and if it fits in the broader picture that the global economy is doing fine, you will see oil bottoming here in the next $5, $6 a barrel and probably making close to a new high by the end of the year. so everybody understands why that's a positive, but there are some who want to read both the decline in crude and gold as, all right, we're not going to have inflation and we're also not going to hav
words of calm. a day later, how is this sinking in? >> well, i think obviously the city, the environment around the city is still in a state of shock. the city will not be business as usual today. many of the streets around us you can see have been closed off, back bay, the entire area of the finish line is closed off and shut down. but like any city like new york, after september 11th, like any city in this country, people are resilient, we'll go on. >> yesterday was a special day for people outside of boston, can you explain? >> oh, joe. >> you know, the sox play, it's a holiday in boston, actually. >> it's a holiday. >> the sox play in the afternoon. you were there with your son. >> it's a traditional holiday. it's perhaps the greatest day for the city during the course of the year. it's a day when the entire city wears a smile. it's a day when hundreds of thousands of people arrive here from literally around the globe and certainly around the nation to run, first, in the boston marathon, 26 miles in massachusetts, to the boylston finish line. the game concludes just as the middle of
't create a fail safe environment. >> reporter: investigators have swept up a large amount of potential evidence including small bomb fragments and surveillance pictures and tape but we have to say it's too early to know if this attack was a work of a terror group, domestic or foreign, or the act of a lone wolf who was inspired to act out. charlie? >> bob orr, thanks. cities around the country increased security. with us now is rudy giuliani mayor of new york city during the 9/11 attacks who consults with other cities on handling terror attacks and also john miller, nypd commissioner during mr. giuliani's tenure. a this turns the clock back to 2001. whatever the thinking was on september 12th is now the thinking today. >> it really reminds us right, of what we knew on september 11th and september 12th that the big news here is this is a horrible attack terrible attack, my heart goes out to the people that were hurt but surprising there haven't been more of these since september 11th. we expected many attacks like this. the raleally remarkable story is so many ha
in an urban environment and there's a lot of buildings around and other materials that will stop some of this evidence as it crawls across the pavement and it will be found. the agents will go in and start conducting a crime scene investigation to find even the most minute pieces of evidence and what we call bag and tag and send to the laboratory. in the laboratory, the forensic scientists, examiners, will look at these pieces of debris and then start making conclusions as to what the device consisted of. >> how do you-- i understand how you could piece together what was the bomb made of. how did it work, how was it detonated and so on. but how-- we're told in the pan am 103 bombing which you helped investigate, that it was a thumbnail sized piece of evidence that led to the identity of the bomber. i mean, how can that be? how can you get to the identity from the remnants of the bomber? >> well, sometimes in pan am 103, the fragment of the circuit board that was the timer that detonated the device, is so generically-- well, not generically, but so specific you can relate that back to
ripe environment, target rich environment. it's just tragic to go from this horrific scene, i think everybody was just shocked, but i'll tell you what, i'm angry. i know a lot of other people are angry. i got a text, a long text from doug flutie, former quarterback, as you know, boston college fame, saying where do i sign up? who do we go and get? you see joann drowsy helping out a -- andruzi helping out. we're going to do a top to bottom review of what went right and wrong and make sure it doesn't happen again. >> steve: i understand the anger. but you look at all the first responders, all the police officers, all the national guardsmen who were there yesterday. the city was vigilant. yet it just takes one. >> listen, it does take one. certainly because it is the marathon, it is the showcase, really of the city and the state, you have all those people there anyway. thank goodness they were actually there because the first responders, the medical personnel, the tents are right there. they're able to adjust from high duration to almost like a war type of reaction, type of force to pr
a weapon that is miniaturized but also can survive and function in a very stressful environment. and the important thing here is that in terms of their test history, north korea has never successfully tested a ballistic missile warhead to a range greater than 1300 kilometers. okay, then the third challenge is what missiles they have and what can they do. at the low end of the scale, the north koreans have 5-600 swan missiles which are basically a variant of the scud first flown by the soviets pack in the 1950s. and those give north korea the ability to cover targets pretty much in most of south korea. then there's the no-dong missile which has a range of 1300 kilometers, that allows coverage of targets in japan as well as south korea. but when you move beyond that, you get into a series of missiles that really cannot be regarded as proven. the focus of the last couple of weeks has been on this missile, two were reportedly moved towards the coast of north korea. there was some speculation that today in honor of the birthday there might be a launch. in this missile's supposed to h
into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, if stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if it's from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life afraid. like oh my god, something bad's around the corner. living your life that way -- >> most of the time it isn't.
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)